17.06.2016
Sculptures by Alessandro Rizzi, Launch Book

Sculptures by Alessandro Rizzi is a book whose photographs were shot over the timespan of a few hours in Washington D.C. on December 14, 2014, and more precisely, during the civil rights protests that took place in the capital after the fatal shooting and civil unrest originating in Ferguson. Rizzi gives back a sharp and paradigmatic work on American society as a whole, and on the importance of a political demonstration that is a sign of the times and is coherent to its prescribed script, he plays with the fragments and cracks of what could be a historic moment for the struggle of the black community but that does not appear to be so: the sculptures at play in this event are part of a larger scenario that provides for their presence and contribution as actors both united and alone. This kind of structural weakness of the human element does not manifest in what is portrayed in the photographs which always appears to be plastic and structured, but instead lives within this visual paradox, as testimony to the distance in the union, and a fragility, despite the solidity, structure, and plasticity within each one of us.

Abiding by the facts, we can affirm that Sculptures is in all respects an instant book whose photographs were shot over the timespan of a few hours in Washington D.C. on December 14, 2014, and more precisely, during the civil rights protests that took place in the capital after the fatal shooting and civil unrest originating in Ferguson. Rizzi gives back a sharp and paradigmatic work on American society as a whole, and on the importance of a political demonstration that is a sign of the times and is coherent to its prescribed script, he plays with the fragments and cracks of what could be a historic moment for the struggle of the black community but that does not appear to be so: the sculptures at play in this event are part of a larger scenario that provides for their presence and contribution as actors both united and alone. This kind of structural weakness of the human element does not manifest in what is portrayed in the photographs which always appears to be plastic and structured, but instead lives within this visual paradox, as testimony to the distance in the union, and a fragility, despite the solidity, structure, and plasticity within each one of us.

“I’m surprised myself, I never imagined i could leave in order to document a single day of a manifestation. And I still feel this surprise, but I wanted to be present at the biggest event for the rights of Afroamericans from Martin Luther King’s times. The very strong sense of brotherhood I felt towards this human and ethnic group of people was triggered in me by a love affair I had with an Afroamerican girl (born in Italy from American father): when the riots in Ferguson started, I asked myself what I could do to bear witness to the very serious events that were taking place there and, at the same time, to demonstrate my closeness to the person I loved.” Alessandro Rizzi

17/06/2016 at 7.30 pm